The Nature of Sin for Wiccans

A conversation on ISCABBS concerning the nature of Sin; pay special attention to the words of my esteemed colleague John Stitely …
Oct 19, 1996 00:03 from Nae
I have what some may consider to be a silly question….
My fiance & I are getting married in a year and we are trying to find a church that we feel comfortable at in our area. The main religious choices I have are Catholic, Lutheran and Southern Baptist. We know we don’t want the strict Catholic, so we are really looking towards Lutheran or Southern Baptist. I tried looking on the internet for information on their beliefs and I couldn’t find a clear cut answer. I was raised Christian Reformed (basically believing in God and that he does not expect anyone to be perfect and accepts us for our sins). My question is……

What are the basic beliefs of Lutheran and Southern Baptist? Which would be close to what I grew up with? We do not want a “you have to be perfect and we will accept nothing less” mentality. Basically because we already “live in sin” and I don’t want to feel screamed at every week for that, even though I know that is not what the Lord intended for us to do….

Can someone who is familiar with these two help me out and give me some basics? I would appreciate it. Thanks in advance.

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Who I am, and Why

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I’ve been asked several times why it is that I am Wiccan, Pagan, and a Witch as opposed, to, say, Evangelical Baptist Christian. Here’s the story.


Context is everything.

At the time I originally wrote this essay, for Muslims, Christian arguments were irrelevant. Today, they are less irrelevant and more a cause for wariness and rage on the part of some, or a cause for scholarship, or … irrelevant.

For Jews, Christian arguments are things to keep a wary eye on, watching for signs of renewed pogroms — signs which unfortunately do come up from time to time.

For members of other religions, even less attention is paid.

But NeoPagans are, for the most part, former Christians: not people who are in ignorance of the message of Christianity, nor people who are sublimely or warily unconcerned with it, but people who have been steeped in it and have rejected it. (Note the use of the phrase “for the most part;” we certainly have people who have come out of — or who have not left — other traditions as well. But, for the most part, these people have little hostility toward their milk religions.)

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