[Stargate: Atlantis episode] Outcast: personal thoughts.

February 20th, 2008, 10:26 am

ETA: WARNING
It was just abruptly borne in on me that a warning for personal history of child-molestation needs to be here.

So I watched it. I watched it after I’d read a bunch of comments, and I watched it twice, and I read a bunch more comments, and read a bunch of tags, and reasons why John argued with his father and never reconciled, and where his mom was and why, and what all this has to do with Nancy, the “best thing he ever did,” and why Nancy – who ought to have known better [as a person involved in top-secret matters herself] – was talking about his secrets that he would never share.

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Thoughts on the Source of Morality

May 4th, 2009, 08:14 am

[info]mecurtin posted part of a discussion happening elsewhere, where she argues:

Given that there are *in fact* virtuous atheists and agnostics, religious belief *must not* be required for virtue. That’s what “sine qua non” means. The existence of moral atheists disproves the thesis that religious belief is necessary for a moral compass. Rod has acknowledged the observable *fact* that moral atheists exist — you cannot go on to argue that belief in God must be necessary for moral behavior.
Given that there are *in fact* virtuous atheists and agnostics, religious belief *must not* be required for virtue. That’s what “sine qua non” means. The existence of moral atheists disproves the thesis that religious belief is necessary for a moral compass. Rod has acknowledged the observable *fact* that moral atheists exist — you cannot go on to argue that belief in God must be necessary for moral behavior.

 

I would personally argue, as I have before, that morality is trained into the individual before knowledge of a divinity is transferred to that individual.

The infant’s very first interactions with Society comes through her primary caregiver – mother, wetnurse, adoptive primary caregiver, the Giver Of Milk. Infants primarily learn at that point ask, and it shall be given unto you, although some must learn ask and demand as you will, it will do you no good: your needs will not be met on time.

Infants also learn Cry injustice and dismay, and you shall be comforted – again, with the above caveat. I shall ask you to take that as read, from here on in.

These are the very roots of moral behavior. Please note the extreme lack of an invisible deity, and the lack of fear of the caregiver which is going on here.

The next roots also occur in the absence of deity: Things still exist even when you cannot see them, and don’t hit/don’t bite.

The final two roots occur in the presence of the understanding of language, although not necessarily in the presence of the use of language: share your belongings even when you would rather not, and when you have a fight, you can go back to being friends afterward.

Those are the roots on which all other moral behavior is based. They all are trained into the human (or fail to be so trained) before language, and therefor the concept of deity, is available to her.

The book All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten by Robert Fulghum argues this same issue, as I understand it, although it comes in at a later point in the child’s development: behaving well is a cornerstone, a necessary foundation, to having a society in which children survive. These are things that our cousins the apes and the chimpanzees learn from their mothers and their kin-groups; and no one has yet argued that these are rooted in a religious system there.

In fact, I would argue that the thesis that a Deity is necessary to moral behavior is evidence that the one posing it does not have a sound moral compass of her or his own.

Who is a [C]hristian, again?

October 11th, 2011, 02:38 pm

Every once in a while, it’s necessary to revisit this discussion. As a former christian I have a unique view of the question, my own efforts to gain a pure and therefore muscular and supportive version of the religion having been met with a series of increasingly narrow definitions that, eventually, defined me right out.

Yeah, really: I was a teenaged conservative fundamentalist evangelical Christian, halleluiah! God-fearing and Bible-studying, Amen!

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Interesting timeline of The Gay and World Climate

May 10th, 2012, 11:06 pm

So I looked for an academic history of gay marriage to pull together all the stuff I’d been hearing, and found this intriguing paragraph:

It was in the thirteenth century, however, that the first laws against sodomy emerged and began to be enforced. Through the next several centuries in the West, all manner of behavior deemed deviant or unnatural began to be condemned, causing a shift from the earlier belief that same-sex unions were “problematic” because they were interpreted as unnatural to the belief that same-sex unions were a serious threat to society—and, like heretics, witches, and Jews, practitioners of such unions were violently repelled.



This is precisely when the Medieval Glaciation period began, plunging all of Europe into famine and plague up through the 1800s.

When prayer and repentance failed to fix the situation, folks tried to get rid of the people they figured God was punishing them for tolerating.

Look, folks: it’s warm. We have plenty of food. We have plenty of people. We have plenty of oldpeople.

It is fine for us to recognize gay relationships.

The Harrowing of Elizabeth Fritzl: I dun tol’ you so!

May 19th, 2008, 01:50 pm

Let us begin with this section from Ephesians:

22Wives, submit yourselves unto your own husbands, as unto the Lord.

23For the husband is the head of the wife, even as Christ is the head of the church: and he is the saviour of the body.

24Therefore as the church is subject unto Christ, so let the wives be to their own husbands in every thing.

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“Becoming what you hate” is not the worst part: an open letter to people who don’t read my journal.

  • July 28th, 2012, 10:49 pm.

Referring, of course, to the old – and quite true – adage about appropriate responses to attack, Nietzsche: “Beware that, when fighting monsters, you yourself do not become a monster . . . for when you gaze long into the abyss, the abyss gazes also into you.”
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The Forge Chapter 8

Daylight had grown to three solid hours at a time when the lady Grfaldn sent for me. Tili came with the message, leaning around the door into the small forge which had been given to Dval. He waved me away from the bellows, and I followed the tiny girl down the halls.

There was a lovely scar on her arm, a good four centimeters across and eight long; I was quite proud of it. There didn’t seem to be any redness around it, and she said it didn’t even itch any more either. Dval and I had ignored the fact that her arm, cloven clear to the white bone, would obviously have to come off and had carefully stitched each layer of muscle. She was already using it, if only carefully.

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The Forge Chapter 7

Thumping sounded from away outside the cavern. Biri (whose name I had finally learned) dived into the tunnel and sped off, dodging the debris unthinkingly. (I couldn’t do it that fast, but enough trips back and forth with buckets of water etc., and you get pretty good at avoiding the bruisers.) Two minutes later we heard his triumphant cry echoing down the blackness, and the … boots, as it happened, coming toward us.

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